WAESOL Online

Real Learning in a Virtual Space

At WAESOL, we want to encourage you in your continued efforts to support your students and develop as teaching professionals. To this end, we were honored to launch WAESOL Online in April 2020, with more sessions ongoing in 2021.

We are excited to continue bringing you online trainings in 2021. We have offered 5 very successful sessions thus far in 2021. Scroll down to read about additional offerings in the coming months.

Each training is $15 for WAESOL members, $20 for non-members. Be sure to become a WAESOL member prior to registering to ensure member pricing. All sessions qualify for WA State clock hours ($3/hour).



Topic Analysis Research Project (TARP)

Saturday, June 5th, 2021, 9:00am-12:00pm

This session qualifies for 3 clock hours. 

  • Dr. David Martin, Washington State University
  • Erica England, Holland/Terrell Library, Washington State University
Description:

This workshop presents a project affectionately called the TARP (Topic Analysis Research Project) that engages students in discussion about what makes an effective/useful/successful research adventure by asking them to work through a series of steps in determining if a topic is Researchable, Worthwhile, and/or Interesting.  In the process, we will discuss what each of these questions mean in real terms and how to get students to be more effective at articulating what they are doing and why when they engage in research.  After discussing the concept, we will do a simulation on a range of sample topics and discuss the findings.  At the end of the workshop, participants will have a chance to discuss how a similar assignment might fit into their own curriculum.

Objectives:

During the workshop, participants will

  • Engage in discussion about what makes a useful/effective/successful research topic
  • Discuss the concept of the topic analysis research project (TARP) and how it plays out in the research and writing process
  • Participate in a short simulation as students by selecting a topic and doing quick preliminary research to answer the essential questions of the TARP (is it Researchable, Worthwhile, Interesting?)
  • Develop a TARP lesson that can be potentially implemented within their curriculum
Presenter Bios

David Martin is an assistant professor in the English department at WSU and has taught in a variety of venues, to include middle/high school, college ESL, and college composition.  He has a PhD in Language and Literacy, a MA in teaching ESL, and K-12 certification with reading, ESL, and language arts endorsements.  David’s current teaching assignment has him teaching primarily transitional composition classes with a focus on helping students develop information literacy and basic composition skills.  He also occasionally teaches teacher preparation courses as needed.

Erica England is the First-Year Experience Librarian at the Holland/Terrell Library at Washington State University, where she serves as the Undergraduate Services Instruction Coordinator and liaison to the composition program. Prior to joining WSU, she worked as a librarian at both the University of Alabama and the University of Central Florida. Previous to that, she worked in secondary schools, as both a school media specialist and a classroom teacher. Her research interests are centered around the first-year experience and the effect that information literacy instruction has on student success.


Narrative Writing – The Remix

Tuesday, July 13th, 2021, 1:00pm-4:00pm

This session qualifies for 3 clock hours. 

Dr. David Martin, Washington State University

Description:

This workshop presents a narrative remix activity that has been done in a transitional composition class at WSU and could be adapted at multiple levels.  In this workshop, we will view examples of student projects, discuss the assignment itself and how it was implemented, and have small group discussions of the projects and the assignment itself.  Additionally, participants will take on the role of student in creating collaborative narrative projects and then jump back into their teacher selves to see how this project could be implemented within their curriculum.  Ideally, each participant will walk away with ideas and potentially a skeleton lesson plan.

Objectives:

During the workshop, participants will 

  • Engage in discussion about effective narrative elements.
  • Discuss examples of student projects and how these projects might fit into their own curriculum
  • Participate in a short simulation as students crafting a narrative remix
  • Develop a narrative remix lesson that can be potentially implemented within their curriculum
Presenter Bio

David Martin is a teaching assistant professor in the English department at WSU but has taught in a variety of venues, to include middle/high school, college ESL, and college composition.  He has a PhD in Language and Literacy, a MA in teaching ESL, and K-12 certification with reading, ESL, and language arts endorsements.  David’s current teaching assignment has him teaching primarily transitional composition classes with a focus on helping students develop information literacy and basic composition skills.  He also occasionally teaches teacher preparation courses as needed.